ACTIVE CAMPAIGNS

FREEDOM FROM HUNGER

This California-based charity has been helping the poor for over 70 years. “Established in 1946, Freedom from Hunger is an international development organization that brings innovative and sustainable self-help solutions to the fight against chronic hunger and poverty.

Freedom from Hunger combines microfinance with health and education services to equip very poor families to improve their incomes, safeguard their health and achieve lasting food security.”

COVID-19: Support Vulnerable Women around the World

As the COVID-19 pandemic races across the globe, Freedom from Hunger is responding.  They are finding new ways to deploy the experience, technologies, staff and Community Agents to help the most vulnerable people.

Freedom from Hunger has launched an initiative to provide unconditional cash payments to carefully targeted and qualified women in the most vulnerable communities. Freedom from Hunger has the infrastructure to screen and identify beneficiaries, safely deliver cash payments, evaluate impact and prevent fraud.

Visit Website

You can donate digital currency to support Freedom from Hunger’s mission to end hunger and poverty. It’s easy, and it’s secure. Just scan the appropriate QR code, or copy and paste the Bitcoin address.

Days Left

Unlimited

Bitcoins Raised

0.00079216

Progress

TOR PROJECT

The Tor network is a group of volunteer-operated servers that allows people to improve their privacy and security on the Internet. Tor’s users employ this network by connecting through a series of virtual tunnels rather than making a direct connection, thus allowing both organizations and individuals to share information over public networks without compromising their privacy. Along the same line, Tor is an effective censorship circumvention tool, allowing its users to reach otherwise blocked destinations or content. Tor can also be used as a building block for software developers to create new communication tools with built-in privacy features.

Individuals use Tor to keep websites from tracking them and their family members, or to connect to news sites, instant messaging services, or the like when these are blocked by their local Internet providers. Tor’s onion services let users publish web sites and other services without needing to reveal the location of the site. Individuals also use Tor for socially sensitive communication: chat rooms and web forums for rape and abuse survivors, or people with illnesses.

Journalists use Tor to communicate more safely with whistleblowers and dissidents. Non-governmental organizations (NGOs) use Tor to allow their workers to connect to their home website while they’re in a foreign country, without notifying everybody nearby that they’re working with that organization.

Groups such as Indymedia recommend Tor for safeguarding their members’ online privacy and security. Activist groups like the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) recommend Tor as a mechanism for maintaining civil liberties online. Corporations use Tor as a safe way to conduct competitive analysis, and to protect sensitive procurement patterns from eavesdroppers. They also use it to replace traditional VPNs, which reveal the exact amount and timing of communication. Which locations have employees working late? Which locations have employees consulting job-hunting websites? Which research divisions are communicating with the company’s patent lawyers?

A branch of the U.S. Navy uses Tor for open source intelligence gathering, and one of its teams used Tor while deployed in the Middle East recently. Law enforcement uses Tor for visiting or surveilling web sites without leaving government IP addresses in their web logs, and for security during sting operations.

The variety of people who use Tor is actually part of what makes it so secure. Tor hides you among the other users on the network, so the more populous and diverse the user base for Tor is, the more your anonymity will be protected.

Why we need Tor

Using Tor protects you against a common form of Internet surveillance known as “traffic analysis.” Traffic analysis can be used to infer who is talking to whom over a public network. Knowing the source and destination of your Internet traffic allows others to track your behavior and interests. This can impact your checkbook if, for example, an e-commerce site uses price discrimination based on your country or institution of origin. It can even threaten your job and physical safety by revealing who and where you are. For example, if you’re travelling abroad and you connect to your employer’s computers to check or send mail, you can inadvertently reveal your national origin and professional affiliation to anyone observing the network, even if the connection is encrypted.

How does traffic analysis work? Internet data packets have two parts: a data payload and a header used for routing. The data payload is whatever is being sent, whether that’s an email message, a web page, or an audio file. Even if you encrypt the data payload of your communications, traffic analysis still reveals a great deal about what you’re doing and, possibly, what you’re saying. That’s because it focuses on the header, which discloses source, destination, size, timing, and so on.

A basic problem for the privacy minded is that the recipient of your communications can see that you sent it by looking at headers. So can authorized intermediaries like Internet service providers, and sometimes unauthorized intermediaries as well. A very simple form of traffic analysis might involve sitting somewhere between sender and recipient on the network, looking at headers.

But there are also more powerful kinds of traffic analysis. Some attackers spy on multiple parts of the Internet and use sophisticated statistical techniques to track the communications patterns of many different organizations and individuals. Encryption does not help against these attackers, since it only hides the content of Internet traffic, not the headers.

Staying anonymous

Tor can’t solve all anonymity problems. It focuses only on protecting the transport of data. You need to use protocol-specific support software if you don’t want the sites you visit to see your identifying information. For example, you can use Tor Browser while browsing the web to withhold some information about your computer’s configuration.

Also, to protect your anonymity, be smart. Don’t provide your name or other revealing information in web forms. Be aware that, like all anonymizing networks that are fast enough for web browsing, Tor does not provide protection against end-to-end timing attacks: If your attacker can watch the traffic coming out of your computer, and also the traffic arriving at your chosen destination, he can use statistical analysis to discover that they are part of the same circuit.

The future of Tor

Providing a usable anonymizing network on the Internet today is an ongoing challenge. We want software that meets users’ needs. We also want to keep the network up and running in a way that handles as many users as possible. Security and usability don’t have to be at odds: As Tor’s usability increases, it will attract more users, which will increase the possible sources and destinations of each communication, thus increasing security for everyone. We’re making progress, but we need your help. Please consider running a relay or volunteering as a developer.

Ongoing trends in law, policy, and technology threaten anonymity as never before, undermining our ability to speak and read freely online. These trends also undermine national security and critical infrastructure by making communication among individuals, organizations, corporations, and governments more vulnerable to analysis. Each new user and relay provides additional diversity, enhancing Tor’s ability to put control over your security and privacy back into your hands.

Days Left

Unlimited

Bitcoins Raised

0.00329531

Progress

FREEDOM OF THE PRESS FOUNDATION

Our Mission
Freedom of the Press Foundation (FPF) is a 501(c)3 non-profit organization that protects, defends, and empowers public-interest journalism in the 21st century.

The organization works to preserve and strengthen First and Fourth Amendment rights guaranteed to the press through a variety of avenues, including the development of encryption tools, documentation of attacks on the press, training newsrooms on digital security practices, and advocating for the public’s right to know.

Freedom of the Press Foundation is built on the recognition that this kind of transparency journalism — from publishing the Pentagon Papers and exposing Watergate, to uncovering the NSA’s warrantless wiretapping program and CIA secret prisons — doesn’t just happen. It requires dogged work by journalists, and often, the courage of whistleblowers and others who work to ensure that the public actually learns what it has a right to know.

Our Work
We accomplish our mission in several ways:

SecureDrop. We lead the development of SecureDrop, an open source platform for secure communication between sources and media organizations, and we support its adoption by newsrooms around the world. SecureDrop is available in 10 languages and used by more than 70 media organizations world-wide, including The New York Times, The Washington Post, Associated Press, The Intercept, USA Today, CBC, and The Guardian.

Digital Security Trainings. We conduct in-person digital security trainings with journalists and filmmakers to help teach them about digital security tools and offer them the best available technologies to protect themselves and their sources.

U.S. Press Freedom Tracker. In partnership with the Committee to Protect Journalists, we run the US Press Freedom Tracker, a website for monitoring press freedom violations in the United States. This nonpartisan news website is the first to provide reliable, easy-to-access information on the number of press freedom violations in the United States—from journalists facing charges to those stopped at the US border or physically attacked while on the job.

Encryption Tools & Special Projects. We also build a variety of experimental technology projects that aim to protect journalists or promote transparency. In 2017, we helped release an Android app called Haven, which can use the sensors on anyone’s smartphone to act as a security system for your surroundings. The project is open source and does not send any information to the cloud. We also built a Twitter bot called FOIA Feed which automatically collects stories that rely on the Freedom of Information Act from over a dozen different news outlets. Additionally, we built a tool that can archive at-risk news outlets which are in danger of being blocked or deleted from the web and it was credited by reporters as being a factor in stopping Peter Thiel from buying and permanently deleting Gawker.

News and Advocacy. We engage in public and legal advocacy around critical press freedom issues, including excessive government secrecy, the protection of whistleblowers, the surveillance of journalists, the Freedom of Information Act, and reporter’s privilege.

Crowdfunding. Non-profit media, independent transparency organizations, and open-source security tools are increasingly a critical component of the journalism landscape. We aim to broaden the financial base of these types of projects by crowd-sourcing funding and making it easy for people to support the best journalism from an array of organizations all in one place.

Our Vision
Freedom of the Press Foundation aims to protect and promote the basic human right of freedom of the press, both in the United States, and abroad, in a world where surveillance, censorship, and manipulation are becoming more sophisticated and more pervasive. Public interest journalism — the kind of journalism that holds power accountable and defends human rights — is under threat everywhere.

Our goal is to ensure that all news organizations worldwide recognize that digital security is a critical press freedom issue in the 21st century. To protect journalists, their sources and their audiences, it is imperative that newsrooms use best-available security tools and practices, including encryption of sensitive communications and materials, anonymization of sources, and distribution of news through secure and censorship-resistant channels.

Days Left

Unlimited

Bitcoins Raised

0.09430463

Progress

WHONIX OS

Whonix A High Security Method of Surfing the Internet
Whonix is a desktop operating system designed for advanced security and privacy. Whonix ™ mitigates the threat of common attack vectors while maintaining usability. Online anonymity is realized via fail-safe, automatic, and desktop-wide use of the Tor network. A heavily reconfigured Debian base is run inside multiple virtual machines, providing a substantial layer of protection from malware and IP address leaks. Commonly used applications are pre-installed and safely pre-configured for immediate use. The user is not jeopardized by installing additional applications or personalizing the desktop. Whonix ™ is under active development and is the only operating system designed to be run inside a VM and paired with Tor.

Privacy ecosystem that utilizes compartmentalization to provide a private, leak-resistant environment.

Whonix is being used by Edward Snowden, journalists such as Micah Lee, used by the Freedom of the Press Foundation and Qubes OS. It has a 7 years history of keeping its users safe from real world attacks.

More info: https://www.whonix.org/

Days Left

Unlimited

Bitcoins Raised

0.00000000

Progress


YOUR DONATIONS TO CRYPTO CAMPAIGNS HELP US MAINTAIN AND DEVELOP THE PLATFORM, THANK YOU FOR YOUR SUPPORT!

28

Campaigns

81

BTC Raised

4957

Donors